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Monday, May 11, 2020 | History

2 edition of Cultural attitudes, perceptions and practices on HIV infection found in the catalog.

Cultural attitudes, perceptions and practices on HIV infection

Cultural attitudes, perceptions and practices on HIV infection

a baseline towards challenging gender dynamics in a cultural context to address HIV in Seke, Zimbabwe.

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Published by SAfAIDS in Harare, Zimbabwe .
Written in English


Edition Notes

ContributionsSouthern Africa AIDS Information Dissemination Service.
The Physical Object
Pagination40 p. :
Number of Pages40
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24004782M
LC Control Number2009334357

  Despite more than a decade of work in the field of HIV/AIDS prevention, global estimates of HIV infections indicated that, million [ million– million] were living with HIV at the. HIVAIDS Care and Counselling: A Multidisciplinary This book is informative as well as educative and can be used as a textbook. disease drugs effective emotional Enrichment example experience explain fear feelings fluids friends give health care professionals HIV infection HIV-positive HIV/AIDS human immune system important individuals /5(7).

The findings revealed that cultural practices, such as premarital counselling, polygamy and widow inheritance, are believed to be of HIV infection among women of people’s perceptions, attitudes and practices regarding health care and illness. The understanding and. Its theme, Culture and Health in the Context of HIV and Aids, aims to unpack experiences and knowledge in how cultural norms and value systems shape community and individual perceptions of health and illness. The conference will also examine how gender relations impact .

al. [13] who emphasize the cultural explanation of HIV/AIDS. Cultural perspective looks at the behaviours and attitudes, which generate practices that could lead to infection of HIV/AIDS rather than both the institutions, and behaviours, which the dependency theory . Latino immigrant men who have sex with men (MSM) are at risk for HIV and delayed diagnosis. An exploratory study using qualitative interviews that assess the beliefs and attitudes of 54 Latino immigrant MSM in Seattle, Washington, is presented. The goal of this research is to determine whether attitudinal differences exist between participants who had and had not been tested and to use any Cited by:


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Cultural attitudes, perceptions and practices on HIV infection Download PDF EPUB FB2

The current study builds on previous HIV/AIDS research among health care workers in Nigeria by examining three different categories of health care professionals in the three levels of health care institutions in Nigeria to ascertain their knowledge, beliefs and attitudes about HIV/AIDS related issues and determine if there is an association Cited by:   Claims that these cultural practices explain differences in HIV prevalence are thus unsubstantiated and speculative at best.

Gender relations and norms Culturally sanctioned gender relations have an especially prominent role in the HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa, where HIV rates in women substantially exceed those in men (UNAIDS ).Cited by: Certain prevalent cultural norms and practices related to sexuality contribute to the risk of HIV infection, for example: Negative attitudes towards condoms, as well as difficulties negotiating.

programs. The third identify cultural beliefs that may facilitate HIV spread. Traditional surgeries, multiple sexual partnership and dry sex practices which could lead to HIV transmission/reception are explained in the parts four, five and seven.

The part eight names a list of recommendations which could serve as guide while defining programs. Social and cultural attitudes mean HIV has caught hold of Africa. Mbaru, senior adviser on HIV and health systems at the Aids Alliance, says understanding and overcoming social and cultural barriers around HIV infection is often the “missing link” when working to reduce HIV infection in African communities.

“There have been tremendous. practices and perceptions relating to HIV/AIDS, respondents were posed a number of multiple-choice questions about specific areas: HIV modes of transmission, knowledge on prevention measures, wrong conceptionsof HIV/AIDS, beliefs, attitudes and practices.

Knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAPs) regarding HIV/AIDS is one of the corner stones in the fight against the disease. Youths are most vulnerable to infection because they engage in risky practices due to a lack of adequate information.

Thus, evaluating their KAPs will help in designing appropriate prevention strategies. This study was aimed at assessing the KAPs of senior secondary Cited by: Studies on knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) have been widely used to design public health policies and for planning health interventions taking into account the needs of the community.8, 9 There is limited information on KAP on HIV/AIDS among the general population of Bolivia, a multicultural nation with great ethnic diversity and Cited by: 7.

James () 'HIV/AIDS and cultural practices in western Kenya: the impact of sexual cleansing rituals on sexual behaviours', Culture, Health & Sexuality,— To link to this article. The first case of HIV in Ethiopia was reported in Since then, HIV/AIDS has become a major public health concern in the country, leading the Government of Ethiopia to declare a public health emergency in Although the epidemic is currently stable, HIV/AIDS remains a major development challenge for Ethiopia.

The spread of HIV in any community is in part determined by the Cited by: An examination of knowledge, attitudes and practices related to HIV/AIDS prevention in Zimbabwean university students: Comparing intervention program participants and non-participants.

Such practices increases the spread of HIV. In conclusion, as much as culture contributes to the spread of HIV, it also contributes to the prevention of the virus by campaigns and sex education, with the use of cultural power. The cultural perceptions of the virus also affect how the virus is researched and how medicines are developed for.

The main purpose of the study was to assess the current state of HIV risk behaviour through knowledge, attitudes and practices of adolescents and young Namibians aged 10 to 24 as a baseline and to inform future programming.

The study also assessed stigma and anxiety, condom use and attitudes, self-efficacy and HIV risk perceptions. Migrant populations are at high risk of Human Immuno Deficiency Virus infection (HIV) and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Studies of HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes and practices among fishermen in developing countries have shown gaps in knowledge and fear of contagion with ambivalent attitudes towards HIV/AIDS and inconsistent universal precautions by: 7.

Risky Rhetoric: AIDS and the Cultural Practices of HIV Testing is the first book-length study of the rhetoric inherent in and surrounding HIV addition to providing a history of HIV testing in the United States from to the present, J.

Blake Scott explains how faulty arguments about testing’s power and effects have promoted unresponsive and even dangerous testing practices for Cited by: of HIV/AIDS infection amongst adolescent girls, it is important to understand the meaning that these girls attach to the pandemic and how it affects their sexual practices.

This research thus aims to explore adolescent girls’ perceptions of HIV/AIDS and how it may impact on. HIV and cultural diversity: the intersection of culture, sexuality and health. the impact of cultural norms and values on perceptions and experiences of HIV, sexuality and Book review: HIV is God’s Blessing: 43 Rehabilitating Morality in Neoliberal Russia.

The Role of Culture in Contributing to the Spread of HIV/AIDS Understanding How Cultural Norms and Practices, Specifi cally Female Genital Mutilation Facilitate the Spread of HIV/AIDS Tholoana Mofolo The practice of female genital mutilation is very common in Africa and has also been shown to occur in the West, specifi cally in the USA and.

Ethical and cultural factors are all closely related to religious beliefs and play an important role in determining attitude. The expectations relating to sexual practices within an ethnic or cultural group are important factors in HIV prevalence. A number of cultural practices contribute to the spread of HIV/AIDS.

Adolescents' attitudes towards HIV infection and HIV-infected persons have been studied in Finland only in graduate theses or with small samples (Hämäläinen and Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, ; Tikkanen and Koskela, ). Earlier international studies have found that young people, despite good HIV/AIDS knowledge, underestimate their own risk Cited by:.

Background. This article discusses how health workers relate to and communicate with clients of VCT and ART treatment. It also looks at how health worker practices in the form of attitudes and behaviours towards clients influence the use of these services.

Methods. In-depth interviews, informal conversations, and participant observation were used to collect data from health workers providing Cited by: 3.

The latest UNAIDS report on HIV informs that approximately million people are HIV-infected worldwide, and – despite some outlier regions – deaths from AIDS are falling and the number of people receiving treatment is going up.

Also, the number of people newly infected with the disease dropped from million in to million in Vanable, P.A., et al., Impact of combination therapies on HIV risk perceptions and sexual risk among HIV-positive and HIV-negative gay and bisexual men. Health Psychol, 19(2): p.

Boily, M.C., et al., Changes in the transmission dynamics of the HIV epidemic after the wide-scale use of antiretroviral therapy could explain increases.